Monday, September 17, 2012

Wednesday's Field Trip

Check back here occasionally to see updates to our schedule and locations on the map below. We are leaving New Trier at 8:00 am and will return before 3:30 pm. Please don't forget to purchase your bus pass! And bring a cell phone and/or a camera (if possible).


View An American Journeys in a larger map

To view the full schedule please click above to access the Google interactive map page. Think about the theme of "place". Where do you live? Why do you live there?

OUR ITINERARY:
  1. Osaka Garden
  2. Jitney at the Court Theatre:
  3. LUNCH (bring your own or ask us for plenty of suggestions)
  4. "Peripheral Views: States of America" at the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College.


12 comments:

Hannah DePorter said...

The "Jitney" performance completely exceeded my expectations. Going into the play all I knew was that it took place in the 1970's, but it turned into a performance filled with emotions ranging from humorous to sad. Growing up in the North shore, we aren't really exposed to different races and cultures, so to see a play about african americans really gave me a better understanding of different races and the field trip alone really showed that the infamous "south side" is a place filled with beauty, not crime.

Noah Quinn said...

I agree with Hannah that this field trip broadened our horizons. Its clear that although we are only 25 miles north, we are in one of the least diverse communities in the country; a polar opposite of the South Side. However to say that the south side is a place of beauty and not crime is a bit of an overstatement. It truly was a scenic and beautiful drive down but we cannot ignore the fact that homicide rates SOARED on Chicago's South Side, as this was one of the worst violent crime years in Chicago history. In Engelwood alone there have been over 20 murders since January. Although this field trip was a moving experience, it is simply not true that the south side is a place not ridden with crime.


http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/social_issues/july-dec12/chicago_08-01.html

Hannah DePorter said...

I agree with you Noah about how there is still crime rates in the south side, but we weren't in Engelwood where you show evidence of violence. Also I think we all need to consider what is the true "south side" is. How do we define it? Just by the crime rates that are most prominent in certain areas? I think it is too broad of a term and we should refer to neighborhoods like Hyde park and Engelwood, instead of the generally "south side".

Hannah DePorter said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Molly Klare said...

I agree with Hannah. You have to ask yourslef, what is the South Side? Where is the boundry? What is the boundry defined by? Take a look at this map. http://bigcitycrimescope.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/chicago_violent_crime_map.png I do recognize that this map is not particularly recent I still think it provides and intresting look that the city. Notice that the red neighborhoods, the neighborhoods with the most crime, are not even on the South Side. Well, I guess that again depends on where you choose to draw the line. This field trip was very cool, because for me it broke these steriotypes of the South Side. The South Side is not a generally bad area, whatever this area may be, but it is an area that is like the rest of the city. Sure, there is crime, like every city, but crim concentrated in a particular neighborhood does not define the South Side of Chicago.

Hannah DePorter said...

Wow that map is extremely interesting. The high crime rates are pretty much scattered around everywhere and the most thought to be "dangerous" part of Chicago, Englewood, is not even red. That is very surprising. We do really have to take into account that this map is almost eight years old and a lot of neighborhoods in Chicago change. For example, carbrini green, a once dominate part of northwest chicago, is now an area of new expensive homes, where it used to be projects not too long ago.

S. Bolos said...

I like the direction this is going in that people are adding to the original map we posted, but in a new way. I wonder what other kinds of maps reveal about the perception of the city. Violent crime is certainly one lens, but property crime is another, and home values is still another! All possible topics for your own blog posts :)

Tom Fawcett said...

I agree that it would be very interesting to look at the various types of maps representing Chicago, and to see how it changes our perception. Therefore, I looked up a few other maps, and instead of changing my perception, many of the maps looked very similar to the one that Molly posted. For example, I saw a map representing the poverty rates as a percent, http://maptogether.org/sites/default/files/images/mapressotest_output.png. Although this map is representing something different from the previous one, the outlines are extremely similar. This made me believe that looking at new maps doesn't change one's lense of Chicago, but only strengthens their same perceptions. But I may be wrong. Are there any maps that look unique and represent something new?

Hannah DePorter said...

http://www.radicalcartography.net/index.html?chicagodots
Here's another map that shows how segregated chicago is by race. It strongly supports the stereotypes of "white" people living north of chicago and "black" people living south of Chicago. Also if you scroll over to the pink income button you can see so clearly how the north is generally very wealthy and the south is very poor.

OC said...

Let's be careful about generalizing. We don't want to engage in what might be called "black and white thinking." According to the latest census data, Chicago is 28% Hispanic and 5% Asian-American. Where are these demographic shifts shown on the map? Also, these categories themselves are problematic. How, for example, should biracial Chicagoans self-identify?

Hannah DePorter said...

If someone is biracial, let's say 50% caucasian and 50% black, they probably identify with the race that is more prominent in their area to fit in with their peers. When looking on the internet however, I found this website: http://www.npr.org/2010/12/20/132209189/how-multi-ethnic-people-identify-themselves
One woman said, "So this study looks at black-white biracial Americans and how they racially identify themselves, and that was the first thing we found, that most identify themselves to others as biracial or multiracial or mixed-race. These terms are certainly becoming much more common today. But in some situations, they identify themselves mono-racially, as black of white". I wonder what those "some situations" are where they identify mono-racially.

Hannah DePorter said...

I just did some research about racial identity and found some very interesting conclusions. Feel free to read my blog and learn more.
http://hannahdeporter.blogspot.com/